Alfius De Bux

Felix Vallotton. Le Bibliophile, 1911

Felix Vallotton. Le Bibliophile, 1911

From John Howe’s facebook page:
MOST useful instructions on how to make a dragon. From “The mysteryes of nature and art : conteined in foure severall tretises, the first of water workes, the second of fyer workes, the third of drawing, colouring, painting, and engrauing, the fourth of divers experiments, as wel serviceable as delightful” published in London, in 1634.

From John Howe’s facebook page:

MOST useful instructions on how to make a dragon. From “The mysteryes of nature and art : conteined in foure severall tretises, the first of water workes, the second of fyer workes, the third of drawing, colouring, painting, and engrauing, the fourth of divers experiments, as wel serviceable as delightful” published in London, in 1634.

(vía the-shadow-is-a-passing-thing)

The ark is the first impressive man-made creation, the world’s first ambitious piece of technology. In the world of Genesis

The ark is the first impressive man-made creation, the world’s first ambitious piece of technology. In the world of Genesis

(Fuente: theparisreview, vía loverofbeauty)

Christopher Nicholson. Model of the Rear of a House, (1938)
 As the wealthy patron of surrealist painters such as Salvador Dali, Edward James delighted in the idea of living in a fantasy-like country house on his Sussex estate. In 1937, he purchased the stone block façade of the recently demolished Pantheon, a once poular assembly hall on Londons Oxford Street built in the late eighteenth century, and had his architect, Christopher Nicholson, create a design for building a modern dwelling behind it. As seen in this photograph of Nicholson’s plaster covered model of the rear of the house, the artist John Piper has painted a row of caryatids along the upper terrace, like Easter Island Statues, reflecting the then-popular psychoanalytical world of Freudian neurosis. The proposal was to construct the sculptures in sheet metal. The house, however was not built. James moved to the United States in 1939 and then to the Mexican Jungle where he spent the remainder of his life hand-building surrealist garden of concrete structures.

Christopher Nicholson. Model of the Rear of a House, (1938)

 As the wealthy patron of surrealist painters such as Salvador Dali, Edward James delighted in the idea of living in a fantasy-like country house on his Sussex estate. In 1937, he purchased the stone block façade of the recently demolished Pantheon, a once poular assembly hall on Londons Oxford Street built in the late eighteenth century, and had his architect, Christopher Nicholson, create a design for building a modern dwelling behind it. As seen in this photograph of Nicholson’s plaster covered model of the rear of the house, the artist John Piper has painted a row of caryatids along the upper terrace, like Easter Island Statues, reflecting the then-popular psychoanalytical world of Freudian neurosis. The proposal was to construct the sculptures in sheet metal. The house, however was not built. James moved to the United States in 1939 and then to the Mexican Jungle where he spent the remainder of his life hand-building surrealist garden of concrete structures.

(Fuente: rudygodinez, vía lormiguel)